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    Denmark to leave on voluntary basis, Johnson & Johnson to cancel coronavirus vaccine rollout – Report – RT World News


    According to media reports, Denmark will not include Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine in its Kovid vaccination program. Danish authorities are being extra cautious and also excluding AstraZeneca vaccines.

    Several local media outlets reported the news on Monday, citing unnamed sources.

    Johnson & Johnson’s shot was temporarily suspended in the US and European Union last month. Deliverance has since begun on both sides of the Atlantic, except in Britain, which never approved the vaccine in the first place.

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    Danish Drug Regulator FAINTS at press conference announcing AstraZeneca vaccine stop (VIDEO)

    Danish authorities have opted for a more cautious route, even though Reuters reported that the country’s immunization efforts could be significantly delayed, except for a shot at Jammu and Kashmir.

    Danish drug authorities dropped the use of AstraZeneca’s Kovid-19 vaccine last month, citing the risk of blood clots as well. In March, Denmark became the first country in the world to temporarily suspend the AstraZeneca shot, but unlike its European neighbors, the country made that suspension permanent.

    After the AstraZeneca ban, the World Health Organization said that Danish authorities had discovered unused doses to poor countries, despite the vaccine being flagged. “Real Risk of Serious Side Effects.”

    Denmark began vaccinating in December, and earlier this year approved four vaccines from AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson, Modern and Pfizer / BioNtech. With the latest cancellation, donations can now only benefit Modern or Pfizer / Biotech shots.

    Although both AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson have been excluded from the national immunization program, Danish newspaper Ekstra Bladet reported later on Monday that voluntary use of both jabs would be permitted.

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